I don’t know exactly when this path started.

When I was a child, I was taken to my mother and uncle’s taichi classes and waiting them, watching from the edge of the tatami the end of the class. Maybe that was the first moment I realized I had an interest in something different from the usual canonical proposals. Those strange movements, slow and controlled, somehow fascinated me, so much that i repeated them on game afternoons in my room and although completely unaware of why and how, it seemed to me that they had their deep meaning.

Later I also started on that road, but it took few more years to receive the first yoga book and the idea of yoga rooted within me. I was fourteen and at the time yoga really sounded like an elitist practice for macrobiotic freaks; for my part, I did not understand anything about it and I just read exercises and explanations, trying to wriggle in strange postures with funny names and count breathing in and out. I was enjoying the game.

This has been my first contact with yoga, through a simple book of practices and philosophies, with a dedication from the author, one, I discovered later, of the pioneers of yoga.

“Many years later, I met her at a festival and approaching her, I explained the story, the book and how it all started from there. With eyes both moved, I remember the words she said to me: -When you say: plant a seed-. The book is still there, on my bookstore, every now and then I leaf through it and read the two dedications, 15 years apart. “

The interest remained cultivated through texts that I found in the home library and stories that I listened to from my family. At the time I was almost ashamed of that passion considered only a female gymnastics that did not coincided with the image of a reckless city boy.

Yoga came knocking on my door years later, while I was working as a climbing instructor in Turin, when a climber friend told me that he taught and offered me a class with him.

That seed planted many years earlier, then received what was needed to make it germinate.

I never stopped; first with him and then, with the beginner’s hunger, I started looking for and trying schools, teachers, seminars, practicing every moment, postures, meditations, breathing. It was like giving voice to that part of myself that had always been there to call me. From that moment every second of my days was occupied by yoga, practice, study. I left climbing to devote myself 100% to yoga, I moved to Milan to follow the practice and what would have been my teacher for a long time and then guide herself in teaching.

I was very lucky, and now infinitely grateful, because I had the opportunity to dive into this thing from head to toe, really putting everything into play and living in close contact with yoga. Time brought me to meet my practices and teachers, following them in a dedicated way and still offering everything I could give today.

I had, and still have, the opportunity to study and travel around India and the world for long periods, to know and understand myself through this discipline, to meet and forge relationships with wonderful and incredible people and to face an infinite number of experiences, beautiful and ugly, with a soul that, without yoga, I would never have had.

“I don’t know if I will be able to do this all my life, after years the value and meaning of this discipline and tradition are so clearly precious that it almost seems to spoil them in the midst of all the modern murmur; practice is a means, a ceremony, a ritual that disciplines us to celebrate something wider, of which we are part.

To this day I continue my sadhana, my spiritual practice, studying and practicing constantly, trying to share this passion with students, pushing for understanding and awareness, making yoga an instrument that acts through the body and that resonates without borders. “

“Yoga karmasu kaushalam”. Yoga is skill in action

B.G. II: 50

 

 

 

Me by Pianoci